Tag Archives: core strategies & physical therapy

Neck injury: When sports become a pain in the neck

neck injury

When any neck injury is suspected a person should not be moved without a medical professional present due to the risk of spinal cord injury.

The neck, also called the cervical spine, is comprised of seven vertebrae stacked on top of each other and separated by discs that act as cushions to absorb shock and provide stability.

In the space between the vertebrae, nerves that supply the arm exit the neck. The spinal cord which supplies sensory and motor function to the arms and legs is protected by the vertebrae (bones), ligaments, discs and muscles around the neck.

Physical therapy can help in prevention and rehabilitation of ACL injuries

Knee injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is unfortunately common during sports activities. The ACL is a thick band of tissue in the center of the knee joint that connects the backside of your thigh bone (femur) to the front of the shin bone (tibia).

The main purpose of the ACL is to prevent the tibia from moving too far forward under the femur and to stabilize the knee during twisting movements. If the tibia moves too far forward, the ACL can be strained and/or ruptured.

Dehydration can be serious! Hydration affects muscle performance and is an important component of injury prevention

hydration dehydration

Summer heat has arrived, which can make it difficult to stay adequately hydrated in the Midwest scorching heat and humidity. Dehydration is caused by an excessive loss of water from the body, and it not only affects performance due to fatigue, but also sets up any active person for an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. There is a significant link that has been shown between dehydration and muscle injuries, and this is because muscles require fluids and electrolytes to function properly.

Golfer’s Elbow is a common injury that can strike more than just golfers

golfers elbow

The golf swing is a full body movement that requires muscle coordination, strength and joint mobility. If one part of the system breaks down, it can cause a ripple effect to other areas of the body. One common injury is called golfers elbow, aka “medial epicondylitis,” which occurs when there is a repetitive use over time of the muscles on the inside of your forearm.

Sports Performance Tip: Train smarter for long-term goals

sports performance

April 2017 – Sports performance training has become widely popular to take an athlete’s skill to the next level.

There is a lot to consider when deciding the best place to enhance your game, but you may not have considered the most important factor: finding a sports performance program that will create long-term success.

Avoid back pain – lifting tips to help work around the house without saying “Ouch”

Lifting Core

MARCH 2016 – It is that time of year again! Time for lifting boxes, sorting through the garage, washing the windows, mopping the floor, cleaning under the rugs and finding the change under the couch.

Nothing like spring cleaning.

This translates to lots of lifting, bending and picking up. These are all things that can aggravate your back.

Stop rolling your IT Band

IT-band

NOVEMBER 2015 – I’m always surprised by the number of runners who say things like “I have tight IT bands, but it is okay because I foam roll them.”

The first problem is the acceptance it is okay to have a chronically ‘tight’ tissue. Under normal circumstances no tissue should hurt or cause discomfort all the time.

The second problem is the idea that massaging what hurts until the end of time is better than actually fixing the cause of the pain.

The IT band, or Iliotibial band, is a strong fibrous stretch of connective tissue that runs from the outside of the hip, down the lateral part of the thigh and attaches to the tibia bone just below the knee.

You don’t have to play tennis to have a tennis elbow

tennis-elbow

SEPTEMBER 2015 – You’ve probably heard of or know someone who has had tennis elbow.  Despite its prevalence, few people have a good understanding of what tennis elbow really is or how to treat it.

What’s especially confusing is despite the name, most people who develop tennis elbow do so without ever picking up a tennis racquet. Think about it, when was the last time you heard of a Serena Williams or Novak Djokovic missing a match due to tennis elbow?

Instead, tennis elbow is much more likely to occur in someone, like you or me, and it is often completely unrelated to sport participation.  

Three tips to help your running

running

AUGUST 2015 – Whether you love running, hate running, or love to hate running here are three simple tips to keep you moving.

Before I begin, let’s set the ground rules. Running for fitness, for a sport or just for fun should not be painful. Running is a natural activity. Our bones, muscles, and joints have been designed for running. If running causes you pain or if you stopped running because of pain, odds are there is something wrong.

With a little guidance, most everyone should be able to return to pain free running.  So let’s not just roll out those ITB (iliotibial band syndrome) bands, calves, and hamstrings. Let’s discover what’s wrong and fix it!

The sports injury madness of March Madness

ankle-injury

MARCH 2015 – If you love college basketball then you love March Madness.  Is your team a favorite, a Cinderella story, a bubble team or will March end in heartache?  The anticipation and tournament stories excite us.  Who’s going pro vs returning next year?  Which team falls short with a key player sidelined by a sports injury?  Can anybody beat Kentucky this season?

These human stories captivate us and the faces of both players and fans reflect the intense emotions experienced win or lose.  As a movement specialist, I love watching these kids move but there’s another story that concerns me most.