Tag Archives: Wellness

Golfer’s Elbow is a common injury that can strike more than just golfers

golfers elbow

The golf swing is a full body movement that requires muscle coordination, strength and joint mobility. If one part of the system breaks down, it can cause a ripple effect to other areas of the body. One common injury is called golfers elbow, aka “medial epicondylitis,” which occurs when there is a repetitive use over time of the muscles on the inside of your forearm.

Emotional maturity is essential for maximum sports performance

Royals-McRae-slide

MAY 2015 – In order for an athlete to display maximum sports performance at any level, it is essential to cultivate and display emotional maturity, the ability to use logical thoughts to make mature decisions during competition.

Specifically, being a successful Major League Baseball player requires an ability to handle the ebb and flow of the difficult job with emotional maturity.

Every MLB player should want to be respected by fellow teammates and opponents but, as baseball fans saw during several Kansas City Royals games in April, getting respect through displays of emotional immaturity can get ugly. 

Solutions for a better, more fluid golf swing

golf-swing

APRIL 2015 – Although I played pro baseball for 16 seasons, including for the Kansas City Royals, my real love in high school and college was golf. I sometimes wonder what might have happened if my life had gravitated towards playing competitive golf instead of baseball.

I was drawn more to golf than baseball because it was more of an individual performance rather than a team performance. 

Get some Shut-Eye! Importance of getting enough sleep

sleep

MARCH 2015 – Working 24-hours a day may be the way to succeed in business, but it is not the way to live a long healthy life. Adequate rest is vital to peak performance. Studies have long supported this theory, and given us an in-depth look at exactly what lack of sleep can do to your ability to perform.

The sports injury madness of March Madness

ankle-injury

MARCH 2015 – If you love college basketball then you love March Madness.  Is your team a favorite, a Cinderella story, a bubble team or will March end in heartache?  The anticipation and tournament stories excite us.  Who’s going pro vs returning next year?  Which team falls short with a key player sidelined by a sports injury?  Can anybody beat Kentucky this season?

These human stories captivate us and the faces of both players and fans reflect the intense emotions experienced win or lose.  As a movement specialist, I love watching these kids move but there’s another story that concerns me most.  

What are you doing to keep your heart healthy?

heart-health

FEBRUARY 2015 – February is Healthy Heart month. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Many believe heart disease to be a “man’s” disease, but it is equally prevalent in women.

There are ways to lower the risk of developing heart disease.

What does exercise form really mean?

exercise form

FEBRUARY 2015 – Think you have good form when working out?  What if there’s more to good form than meets the eye? Popular belief suggests good form means looking in the mirror or having a trainer watch you to ensure an exercise looks good.

However, you can look good in the mirror, yet be using all the wrong muscles to complete the task. 

Fighting the blahs…How to “cheer up” during the winter months

depression

JANUARY 2015 – For the past 3 years, I have offered readers information about the health and nutrition industry. You can read previous articles online at www.kcsportspaper.com beginning with the 12/12 edition.

Being “fit” includes being physically AND mentally fit.  This month I will share some information on a mental condition that most of you have heard about, some of you have experienced or are experiencing, but few understand.

Keys to Peak Performance – Acceleration, Deceleration and Skill

Acceleration, deceleration and Skill

JANUARY 2015 – Would you get into a fast moving race car knowing it lacked brakes?  Unless you’re a true daredevil the answer is no.

So why do the same thing with your body?  Race car drivers rely on their team to provide three distinct areas of performance: 1) acceleration mechanisms (i.e. engine and fuel injection systems); 2) deceleration and control mechanisms (i.e. brakes, steering mechanisms and tires); and 3) driver skill (sport technique).

During movement your body must also possess efficiency in all three areas to perform at its best.